Driving While License Revoked in Cleveland County

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Why was I charged with Driving While License Revoked?

You can be charged with Driving With License Revoked (DWLR) in North Carolina for driving after you have lost your license for any of the following reasons: 

  • Accruing 12 driver's license points within a three-year period
  • Driving While Impaired (DWI) conviction
  • Receiving a Failure to Appear (FTA) for a previous charge
  • Speeding at very high speeds
  • Not paying off previous fines or court costs
  • Failing to pay child support

Driving With License Revoked (DWLR) can range from a Class 1 to Class 3 Misdemeanor. Conviction for this offense can result in a suspension of your license for one year up to a permanent revocation of your license.

Are there different types of DWLRs? 

Yes, there are different levels of DWLRs, depending on what caused your license to be revoked, and how many times you have been charged with DWLR.

If your license has been revoked upon conviction of Driving While Impaired (DWI) and you are then charged with a DWLR, this is a Class 1 Misdemeanor called a DWLR Impaired Revocation. This is one of the most serious types of DWLRs and can carry a punishment of up to four months active time, high fines, and an additional driver's license suspension. 

If your license has been revoked for a civil revocation, such as driving after consuming under the age of 21, and you fail to reclaim your license after the revocation expires, you would be charged with a form of DWLR known as Driving Without Reclaiming License. This offense is only a Class 3 Misdemeanor and will not cause your license to be suspended for an additional period of time.

If you have a Failure to Appear (FTA) on your record for a previous court date, the DMV will revoke your license. If you drive after your license has been revoked for an FTA or after receiving notice from the DMV that your license has been revoked, you can be charged with Driving After Notification or Failure to Appear. This is a more serious form of DWLR classified as a Class 1 Misdemeanor and can cause your license to be suspended for an additional period of time. 

What happens if I have more than one DWLR on my record?

The more DWLRs you have on your record, the longer your license will be suspended. For example, your license can be suspended for an additional one year upon conviction of your first DWLR. Upon conviction of your second DWLR, you may face an additional two-year suspension of your license. After three DWLRs, your license can be permanently revoked.

Why should I hire an attorney for a DWLR?

It is wise to hire an attorney to handle your DWLR case to help you get your charges reduced or possibly even ask the Judge for a Prayer for Judgment Continued (PJC). A PJC will add no additional driver's license or insurance points to your license while preventing you from losing your license for a year.

Because of the many technicalities involved in State laws regarding DWLRs, you should consult with an attorney before pleading to any DWLR charges to make sure you are choosing the option that will give you the best potential for regaining your license and insurance in the future. 

If I can't drive I have no way to get to work. What should I do?

Our attorneys can help you receive a Limited Driving Privilege if your license revocation is not due to an alcohol related offense,  you have not had a previous limited driving privilege, and you have no pending driving charges. A Limited Driving Privilege allows you to drive only for certain reasons, such as traveling to or from work or school during certain time frames, traveling to seek emergency medical care, and limited household maintenance. We will be more than happy to explain to you how these privileges work, and your potential for eligibility. 

What kind of license suspensions are there?

There are two types of license suspensions, temporary and permanent license suspensions. If you have a temporary suspension of your license, you can pay the DMV a $50 fee upon the termination of the suspension period to get your license restored. If your license is permanently suspended, however, you must get a hearing scheduled at the DMV with a judge to determine if your license will be restored. Before you can get your license restored, you must pay all unpaid previous traffic tickets.

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